AIDS Lifecycle - Ride to end AIDS
 

      
Fundraising Tips for Roadies

Roadie Stories

AIDS/LifeCycle is made up of a community of people.
The common thread is HIV.
Whether we are a family member, partner, friend or HIV positive
ourselves, HIV is the reason we do this event.
Our commonality is our dedication to helping people living with HIV.

Eric Anderson
St. Paul, Minnesota

It's not everyday we get to do so much good for so many. When I'm out on the road with AIDS Lifecycle, I'm contributing to the health and welfare of a lot of people: people who need medicine, who need information, and who need to know that they are important.

Eric Anderson St. Paul, Minnesota It's not everyday we get to do so much good for so many. When I'm out on the road with AIDS Lifecycle, I'm contributing to the health and welfare of a lot of people: people who need medicine, who need information, and who need to know that they are important. I enjoy California. The hills, cliffs, ocean, beaches and the smell of those eucalyptus trees after a bit of rain! The fresh strawberries and avocados are great, too. I enjoy my team. We've got a good group. Each year the number of years of experience on the team gets bigger and we get to know each other even better. They're kind, thoughtful, and interesting people; I am eagerly looking forward to seeing them next year!
 
Naima Blackman
Oakland, CA

My name is Naima Blackman and I have been volunteering with the San Francisco AIDS Foundation since the summer of 2000...

I have done many events such as San Francisco Pride, AIDS Walk, HIV Women's party, Magnet party and AIDS/LifeCycle. The reason I decided to volunteer was because my Father had AIDS. He passed away Nov 2, 2008 and I wanted to know more about the virus and help people in the community. I started doing AIDS/LifeCycle 3 years ago as a roadie. At first, I was unsure what my experience would be. Since my first event, it has opened my eyes, heart and soul to understand how other feel living with the virus. Doing this week long ride, I continue to realize we are all individuals but have one main goal, to raise money and find a cure. While doing the ride I feel I accomplish this goal and make my father proud at the same time. With this, I take back home the reward of knowing I may have changed ones life for 7 days and beyond. Naima Blackman
 
Timothy Brodt
Los Angeles, CA

When I was 15, I watched my uncle die of AIDS. When I was diagnosed as HIV-positive, I thought I'd die, too—and it affected how I lived my life...

Two years ago, while I was volunteering as an AIDS/LifeCycle Roadie, a cyclist told me, “You need to stop planning your death and start living your life.” I took the advice to heart. The ride changed me. I found family. I found a community of people who honor each other and see one another for their potential—a utopia I’d never seen or heard of. I didn’t believe in God until the last day of the ride. When it was over, I realized something was gone. The fear and shame I felt were gone.” Shortly before last year’s ALC, my first as a cyclist I lost my job and my health insurance. When I turned to the Center’s Jeffrey Goodman Special Care Clinic, I found nothing but an outstretched hand and compassion. This is why I do the ride.
 
Denise Fick
Dallas, TX

I continue to participate because it is the best place on earth to be for a week. The people on this ride are what make it such a life-changing experience. Nowhere else on earth could you find such a diverse group of people who are so accepting.

This year, two of my friends were recently diagnosed with HIV. Both are dealing with this news with great difficulty and great courage. I know now more than ever how important this event is for all of us. I don’t want to lose another friend to AIDS and I don’t want to hear that another friend has to deal with this life-threatening diagnosis.